Search this collection

Clear all

11 results found

reorder grid_view

Lessons From the Local Level: DACA's Implementation and Impact on Education and Training Success

January 5, 2015

This report examines the ways in which local educational institutions, legal service providers, and immigrant youth advocates have responded to the first phase of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Based on extensive interviews with stakeholders in seven states -- California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, New York, and Texas -- the report identifies initiatives undertaken by educational institutions and other community stakeholders to support DACA youth's education and training success, and examine the impact of deferred action on grantees' academic and career pursuits. It provides examples of promising practices, additional challenges, and key takeaways at the high school, postsecondary, and adult education levels, as well as an exploration of the nature and scope of DACA legal outreach initiatives.

Ending Unwarranted Variation in End-of-life Care in California

May 8, 2013

Californians frequently do not get the kind of care that they want at the end of their lives. In a 2012 survey, 70% of people said they would want to die at home, yet new data show that compared to the national average, Californians at the end-of-life experience more deaths in hospitals and more time in the intensive care unit (ICU). The data also reveal wide variation in the use of hospice, hospital, and ICU services in the last six months of life.The California HealthCare Foundation (CHCF) hosted a Sacramento briefing designed for legislative staff and others interested in understanding practice patterns and variation in end-of-life care in the Golden State. Panelists explained why variation in clinical care at the end-of-life matters, examined how patient preferences are often at odds with the care they get, and explored how the new data might be used to meet the goals set out in the recent Let's Get Healthy California Task Force report.This is the first in a series of four presentations, authored by Mark D. Smith, MD, MBA, founding president and CEO, CHCF.

Variation in End-of-Life Care in California

May 8, 2013

Californians frequently do not get the kind of care that they want at the end of their lives. In a 2012 survey, 70% of people said they would want to die at home, yet new data show that compared to the national average, Californians at the end-of-life experience more deaths in hospitals and more time in the intensive care unit (ICU). The data also reveal wide variation in the use of hospice, hospital, and ICU services in the last six months of life.The California HealthCare Foundation (CHCF) hosted a Sacramento briefing designed for legislative staff and others interested in understanding practice patterns and variation in end-of-life care in the Golden State. Panelists explained why variation in clinical care at the end-of-life matters, examined how patient preferences are often at odds with the care they get, and explored how the new data might be used to meet the goals set out in the recent Let's Get Healthy California Task Force report.

Medical Staff Discrimination/Ignorance; People Living in Underserved Regions; People at the End of Life; People in Hospice; People in a Hospital; Poverty

You Rarely Get What You Don't Know You Want

May 8, 2013

Californians frequently do not get the kind of care that they want at the end of their lives. In a 2012 survey, 70% of people said they would want to die at home, yet new data show that compared to the national average, Californians at the end-of-life experience more deaths in hospitals and more time in the intensive care unit (ICU). The data also reveal wide variation in the use of hospice, hospital, and ICU services in the last six months of life.The California HealthCare Foundation (CHCF) hosted a Sacramento briefing designed for legislative staff and others interested in understanding practice patterns and variation in end-of-life care in the Golden State. Panelists explained why variation in clinical care at the end-of-life matters, examined how patient preferences are often at odds with the care they get, and explored how the new data might be used to meet the goals set out in the recent Let's Get Healthy California Task Force report.

Greater Coordination Between Providers; Increased Community Awareness About Palliative Care Options; Insufficient Palliative Care Staff/Physicians; Integration Into Home-care Systems; Integration into Community-based Settings; Lack of Facilities/Beds; Lack of Knowledge About Palliative Care Options; Palliative Care Training for Medical Staff; People Living in Underserved Regions; Poor Communication Between Providers & Patients

Cost of Dying: Confronting End-of-Life Care Issues

May 8, 2013

Californians frequently do not get the kind of care that they want at the end of their lives. In a 2012 survey, 70% of people said they would want to die at home, yet new data show that compared to the national average, Californians at the end-of-life experience more deaths in hospitals and more time in the intensive care unit (ICU). The data also reveal wide variation in the use of hospice, hospital, and ICU services in the last six months of life.The California HealthCare Foundation (CHCF) hosted a Sacramento briefing designed for legislative staff and others interested in understanding practice patterns and variation in end-of-life care in the Golden State. Panelists explained why variation in clinical care at the end-of-life matters, examined how patient preferences are often at odds with the care they get, and explored how the new data might be used to meet the goals set out in the recent Let's Get Healthy California Task Force report.This is the fourth presentation in a series of four, authored by Lisa Krieger, journalist, San Jose Mercury News.

A Better Benefit: Health Plans Try New Approaches to End-of-Life Care

April 26, 2013

In the event of serious illness, Californians strongly indicate that they would want to have care that adequately addresses pain and discomfort as well as providing spiritual, social and cultural support - all of which are hallmarks of palliative care. Unfortunately, most patients at the end of life do not receive these services or only receive them much later in the course of care than is considered optimal. Among the factors affecting access to palliative care is health insureer reimbursement. Most benefits for these services are patterened on the Medicare Hospice Benefit (MHB), which is limited to patients with an expected prognosis of six months or less and prohibits reimbursement for curative care once patients choose palliative-focused care. This report describes the findings of a scan conducted from August through October of 2012. The study was designed to: Investigate and describe the spectrum of palliative care and hospice benefits and services that California's largest health plans are currently offering or plan to offer soon.Explore the attitudes of health plans and palliative care stakeholders toward coverage of concurrent care (access to hospice or palliative care concurrently with curative or disease-modifying care).Information for this report was gathered through review of published reports and academic literature, interviews with key stakeholder, and interviews with physician leaders of six of the largest health plans (in terms of enrollment) in California.

Additional Research on Models of Care; Additional Research on the Value of Hospice and Palliative Care; Alternative Payment Structures; Increased Community Awareness About Palliative Care Options; Insufficient Palliative Care Staff/Physicians; Integration Into Home-care Systems; Integration into Community-based Settings; Lack of Knowledge About Palliative Care Options; People Living in Underserved Regions; People in Hospice; People with Cancer; Poverty; Time Limits on Care

End-of-Life Care in California: You Don't Always Get What You Want

April 1, 2013

Californians frequently do not get the kind of care that they want at the end of their lives. This report documents research on end-of-life care for Medicare beneficiaries, and analyses it in light of what is known about Californian's preferences for care as they approach death. The research found sharp variation that cannot be explained by differences among patients in age, sex, or race.

Medical Staff Discrimination/Ignorance; People Living in Underserved Regions; People at the End of Life; People in Hospice; People in a Hospital; Poverty

Pioneers in Palliative Care across the Continuum

September 27, 2012

This report summarizes 17 California community-based palliative care programs

Race & Ethnicity and Death & Dying in California

June 14, 2012

Racial and ethnic minorities are fast becoming a larger share of the U.S. population, and California is on the forefront of this change. Culture and ethnicity can play a crucial role in the type of care a person receives towards end-of-life. This factsheet provides an overview of who is dying in California and attitudes and experiences with death and dying in the state.

Cultural & Religious Discrimination; Language Barriers; Racial and Ethnic Discrimination

End-of-Life Care in California: Racial and Ethnic Disparities

March 15, 2007

This presentation discusses the key points from a companion study by the organization on racial and ethnic disparities in end-of-life care.

Racial, Cultural, and Ethnic Factors Affecting the Quality of End-of-Life Care in California, Supplemental Materials

March 1, 2007

These supplemental materials to the full report on racial, cultural, and ethnic factors affecting the quality of end-of-life care in California includes a summary of the report's methodolody, data on how top ten leading causes of death differ among subgroups, the survey tool used for data collection about pharmacies, and a report on responses to the focus groups.

Alternative Payment Structures; Bereavement Support; Cultural & Religious Discrimination; Eligibility Criteria; Lack of Knowledge About Palliative Care Options; Language Barriers; Medical Staff Discrimination/Ignorance; Palliative Care Training for Medical Staff; Payment Structures; Racial and Ethnic Discrimination; Train Staff in Culturally Sensitive Care